Ordnance Survey Road maps… they’re back!

Have you been into W. H. Smiths recently? Popping into my local Blackburn branch, it was nice to see a new Ordnance Survey display, especially because it contained the regional road maps which were discontinued over seven years ago. There was also the classic route planner map for Great Britain, and specialist interest maps like Roman and Ancient Britain – all with new attractive covers and styling.

Continue reading “Ordnance Survey Road maps… they’re back!”

Elmfield Hall & Churchfield House – old houses, new roles

Two enjoyable projects currently on the go involve large Victorian houses, Elmfield Hall, Church and Churchfield House, Great Harwood.

Though quite unrelated as buildings and projects, successive meetings today reminded me of their close similarities. Both are the former houses of locally important Victorians, which subsequently passed into the hands of the pre-1974 local authorities, then to Hyndburn Council and now to social enterprises which provide community related services. Both draw upon a common set of funding sources and both have a cafe! Continue reading “Elmfield Hall & Churchfield House – old houses, new roles”

Manchester Making the Modern City

Every town and city has its story, but few have a history that is essential to understanding how the modern world was made. Manchester was the first industrial city and arguably the first modern city. 

I have been enjoying this new book (edited by Alan Kidd and Terry Wyke), having got a complementary copy for contributing a photograph. It is a critical history of Manchester and how it developed into an international city. It covers the social, political and industrial history rather than the architecture but has lots of background information for significance and conservation reports, including a very useful historical timeline.

Details are HERE.